Bobby Fischer Against The World

YEAR: 2011

DIRECTOR: Liz Garbus

BUDGET: ?

GROSS: ?

 

when i was a kid i played a little chess. i would usually play against a family friend when they came to visit. he was one of those guys that was always competitive and wouldn't even let a little kid win at anything - so, on the few occasions that i won it felt extra good. i also liked to play Battle Chess on my amiga computer - although, i think, for me, it was more about watching the chess pieces fight than actually playing the chess match. anyway, so all that to say, i am not much of a chess player. but you don't have to play chess to enjoy Bobby Fischer Against The World.

prior to watching the film i got caught up reading about chess and the history of the game and found multiple websites that listed their top 10 greatest chess players of all time. and sure enough, in either the first or second spot on every list was bobby fischer!

people that follow chess know this to be true, but i think that maybe the general public who posses only a passing knowledge of it all, and i put myself in that category, i feel like all i ever knew about fischer was that he had gone "crazy" and i never really appreciated how great of a chess player he was.

sports, is filled with those questions of "what could have been?" 

what if ted williams hadn't taken four years off at the height of his talents to go fight in WWII? (how much better would his stats have been)? what if jordan hadn't taken that year off to play baseball?(would they have won 7 in a row?) what if barry sanders hadn't retired so early?(would he have broken walter payton's record?) etc...

what if fischer hadn't virtually retired from chess after winning the 1972 world championship? he was only 29.

unlike other reports or documentary pieces i had seen about bobby fischer in the past, Bobby Fischer Against The World covers his whole life and not just the last couple decades of when he became more and more paranoid and reclusive and angry... all that is still in the film and it is covered thoroughly. but by giving us his full history and really placing his greatness in context, it makes the second half of his life that much more poignant and, for me at least, frustrating.